Super-Heroes 

As many of you know, my mom works for a small Catholic elementary school in New Hampshire. My brother went to school there, my aunt is on their board and my mother was a kindergarten teacher for 10 years before becoming Vice Principal. It’s a very close-knit community and one that my family has a long-standing relationship with. So, when I was diagnosed in 2014, the entire school, from teachers to parents to students rallied around my mom, myself and my family to show their support and love. Being a Catholic school, the students began praying for me weekly, asking God to “heal Mrs. Kathy’s” daughter. Every single child at Mount St. Mary’s Academy did this for me… for over two years. If that’s not good karma, I don’t know what is. So when the kindergartners found out that I had completed treatment this March, that God had “cured” me, they made me cards and a beautiful handmade Super Woman Cape. I was blown away by this gesture. I’m definitely not a super-hero, I did what I had to do and was the only option I had. But the fact that these little girls and boys thought I was some sort of super hero warmed my heart more than I can ever describe.
So about 3 weeks ago, I got the chance to go meet every single one of those students, wearing not just my cape but the biggest smile on my face. I was lucky enough to spend the entire day with these incredible little humans who are so full of life, so innocent but so smart, and so funny and so loving! They didn’t have any filter and didn’t think twice when they asked me questions like “Why did I get cancer?” “Do people look at you different when you don’t have hair?” “Does chemo hurt?” “How did it feel to find out you have cancer?” Some of these questions I’ve literally never been asked before because I think adults would be shy or feel rude to ask such direct questions but the reality is, is that those questions are real, they’re honest and above all, they’re human. I learned so much from these incredible kids and they instantaneously became my super heroes.
It’s a true blessing to get to be surrounded by children, and we should all open our minds to really learning from them more often Because as Shakespeare once said…


Lots of love & light,

Jessy

A Little Story for the Heart

Today was a long day, I spent over 6 hours at the hospital and couldn’t connect to wifi so I couldn’t get a lot of things done for work that I needed to. So that put me to work until a few minutes ago. Booooo, boooo, boooo. I have a headache and I’m just feeling tired and whine-y. So today I feel far from a warrior princess, far from inspiring. But I wanted to write because I heard a story that made me smile and inspired me so I felt I needed to share with you all.

Today I met with Dr. Mandy. As we always do, we chatted about lots beyond leukemia. She has a 5 year old nephew that she loves dearly and let me tell you, is such a handsome little bugger. He was in the airport with his grandmother and there was a woman with dwarfism and as he passed by, he asked out loud why this adult had a “little kids” body? His grandmother quickly gave him the life lesson lecture about how everybody is different and how it’s not nice or polite to point out people’s differences, but instead we should accept people for who they are. He seemed to understand and they moved on. Later as they were boarding the plane, they went to get in their seats and as luck would have it, the woman with dwarfism was sitting right next to him. The grandmother got nervous as she could see his eyes widening and thoughts swirling around his little head… “Oh no, what is he going to say?” But then he looked at her and said “you know what? I think you’re beautiful.” 

You know what, I think you’re beautiful

This girl has probably gotten so many stares, people have probably made fun of her or bullied her in school. But on this random day, a little 5 year old saw what we all should see, that everyone is beautiful. We can learn so much from children and this is a great example. 

I just wanted to share this so we can all be reminded to look past people’s appearances, to give everyone the equal respect that they deserve, to be accepting of people’s differences. Simply put, it’s a reminder to just be kind to others. Just. Be. Kind. 

Lots of love and light,

Jessy